Your Money: Why You Should Tell Your Children How Much You Make

Discussions about family finances can start early and fit a child’s age and ability to understand, but they shouldn’t be avoided.

Discussions about family finances can start early and fit a child’s age and ability to understand, but they shouldn’t be avoided.

Recipe Lab: Texas Chili Makes a Welcome Guest

A Texas chili, like all great beef stews, combines the fragrant spices of a tagine, the succulent beefiness of pot roast and the slurpy heat of a goulash. (Article plus video.)

A Texas chili, like all great beef stews, combines the fragrant spices of a tagine, the succulent beefiness of pot roast and the slurpy heat of a goulash. (Article plus video.)

Ask Well: The Best Time of Day to Exercise to Lose Weight

There is some evidence that working out on a completely empty stomach prompts the body to burn more fat and potentially stave off weight gain, compared to exercising at other times.

There is some evidence that working out on a completely empty stomach prompts the body to burn more fat and potentially stave off weight gain, compared to exercising at other times.

Let’s Get Drinks

Shouts & Murmurs by Kelly Stout: “Friday is no good. I am literally Operation Rolling Thunder mixed with the N.F.L.’s policy on domestic violence.”

Shouts & Murmurs by Kelly Stout: “Friday is no good. I am literally Operation Rolling Thunder mixed with the N.F.L.’s policy on domestic violence.”

Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained “logic boards” it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.U.S. District Judge Willia…

Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market.

"Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."

Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company.

Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.

The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.

They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing.

Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.

A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures.

MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.

The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)



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Apple wins dismissal of lawsuit over MacBook logic boards

Jan 8 Apple Inc won the dismissal on
Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by
selling MacBook laptop computers that contained “logic boards”
it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two
years.U.S. District Judge …

Jan 8 Apple Inc won the dismissal on Thursday of a lawsuit accusing it of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook laptop computers that contained "logic boards" it knew were defective, and which routinely failed within two years.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said the plaintiffs, Uriel Marcus and Benedict Verceles, failed to show that Apple made "affirmative misrepresentations," despite citing online complaints and Apple marketing statements calling the laptops "state of the art" or the "most advanced" on the market.

"Plaintiffs have failed to allege that Apple's logic boards were unfit for their ordinary purposes or lacked a minimal level of quality," Alsup wrote. "Both plaintiffs were able to adequately use their computers for approximately 18 months and two years, respectively."

Alsup gave the plaintiffs until Jan. 22 to amend their lawsuit, which sought class-action status, against the Cupertino, California-based company.

Omar Rosales, a lawyer for the plaintiffs, did not immediately respond to requests for comment. Apple did not immediately respond to a similar request.

The plaintiffs claimed that Apple's sale of MacBooks since May 20, 2010, violated consumer protection laws in California and Texas, where the lawsuit began last May before being moved.

They also contended that Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook was told about the defective logic boards in 2011, but did nothing.

Logic boards contain computer circuitry and are sometimes known as motherboards.

A separate and still pending lawsuit in California accuses Apple of defrauding consumers by selling MacBook Pro laptops in 2011 that contained defective graphic cards, causing screen distortions and system failures.

MacBooks are part of Apple's Mac line of desktop and laptop computers. The company reported unit sales in that business of 18.91 million in its latest fiscal year.

The case is Marcus et al v. Apple Inc, U.S. District Court, Northern District of California, No. 14-03824. (Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York. Editing by Andre Grenon)



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Google to start selling auto insurance in the U.S., analyst says

SAN FRANCISCO Google Inc (GOOGL.O) may be moving into the U.S. auto insurance market with a shopping site for people to compare and buy policies, an analyst said on Thursday, as it continues to shift its attention to the automotive industry. The sea…

SAN FRANCISCO Google Inc (GOOGL.O) may be moving into the U.S. auto insurance market with a shopping site for people to compare and buy policies, an analyst said on Thursday, as it continues to shift its attention to the automotive industry.

The search giant is planning soon to pilot its new Google Compare auto insurance comparison shopping site, wrote Forrester analyst Ellen Carney in a note. According to Carney, the company has been pitching the service to insurance providers for more than two years.

Google, which currently offers a service in the UK for users to compare over 125 auto insurance options, takes a cut when a user buys insurance online or by phone.

Industry experts say the Mountain View-based company has increasingly been exploring online searches tailored toward specific industries or markets. Google already offers its users a site to compare travel destinations and find the cheapest flight fares, for instance.

Google in past years has begun to expand beyond its home turf of Internet search and advertising, seeking to extend its technological dominance to fields as diverse as self-driving cars and robotics.

Carney expects the California pilot for the new service to begin in the first quarter of 2015. Google is already licensed to sell auto insurance in 26 states and is working with a handful of insurers including Dairyland, MetLife and others, she said.

In addition, a Google employee is licensed to sell insurance on behalf of CoverHound, a San Francisco-based company that pulls insurance options from the largest carriers.

Google said it does not comment on speculation.

(Reporting By Christina Farr; Editing by Diane Craft)



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