Protecting Children from the Internet

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For parents, protecting their children is their number one priority. These days, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult.  The internet is becoming a part of our lives every day.  Internet is even on our cell phones, and it has been. A study, conducted by AVG, stated that 69% of children ages 2-5, could operate a computer rather than tie their shoe laces. Of that demographic, 58% could play a video game, but only 52% could ride a bicycle. Games on the Smartphone seemed more appealing than knowing how to call emergency services; with only 20% knowing how to do so.
With any generation, young people adopt technology faster than older ones do, it’s a fact. So knowing this, it’s a parent’s obligation to protect their children from a major threat, the internet.  Face it, it’s all around us, making it even more accessible to children.  Even the schools our children attend, have computers that are connected to the internet. The schools should be doing their best to secure their computers. What about the computers at your home? Most, if not all, computers are connected to the internet. But not only computers! Microsoft’s Xbox 360, Sony’s Play Station, and Nintendo’s Wii can be connected to the internet to have online parties, and stream movies into the home! But keeping the game system safe for your children is easy, just pull the plug, or setup parental controls. The focus of this post is to handle the tricky internet connection, your computer.
Your computer accesses the internet through a web browser. Software designers put in a feature that is beneficial to people accessing public computers. The feature is named something different in every browser, but the concept remains the same. The concept is called Private Browsing. When private browsing is turned on, the browser will not record anything about the browsing session. Essentially it’s like you never went on the internet.  Below I will explain how to turn this feature off, on Internet Explorer 8.0, Firefox, and Safari.
1.       Internet Explorer:
·         Go to Start, then Run and type in gpedit.msc.

·         Now navigate to:  Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Internet Explorer/InPrivate
·         Now on the right-hand side, go ahead and double-click Turn off InPrivate Browsing and choose Enabled.
2.       Firefox: Firefox is a really soft piece of clay. But, in Firefox we cant disable private browsing, instead we can get a key logger, I will explain after this section. We can make the internet family friendly. So, it will be easy to child-proof the internet. All this requires is downloading and installing plug-ins for Firefox. I’ll give you three of my favorite.
·         ProCon Latte: Blocks out any inappropriate websites and any sites that you set that shouldn’t be accessed.
·         LeechBlock: This utility limits access to time wasting websites (Facebook, YouTube, MySpace) during working times.
·         KidZui K2: Loved by Teachers and Parents for smaller children.
3.       Safari: The technique for disabling private browsing is really just removing the option in the menu. Before continuing we must have Xtools installed, its free.  If you have a newer Mac, it should be already included. If you have trouble with these instructions, take advantage of your Mac ownership, and make a appointment at the Genius Bar.
·         Step 1: Go to applications folder in Finder
·         Step 2: right click (with a mighty mouse or 2 button mouse, or Control+click for one button mice) on safari and choose “Show Package Contents”
·         Step 3: Go to Contents, then Resources, then English.lproj folder (or a respective folder for whatever language you have maybe)
·         Step 4: Double click on MainMenu.nib to open it in interface builder
·         Step 5: look at the window with the safari menu, click on Safari to expand it, then click on the Private Browsing menu item
·         Step 6: hit the delete key and it disappears
·         Step 7: hit command+s to save, close interface builder if you want, and relaunch safari.
Of Course at some age, our kids want some more privacy. But as mentioned above we can use a key logger to both keep a eye on them and let them spread their wings. In the case of Facebook, some kids won’t “friend” their parents. With a key logger, you can collect their password to Facebook, and what they posted and commented on. With some investigating you can even log in as them with your newly collected password and actually see what they see, friend yourself, and set privacy settings! The best key logger I have found is below.  I found a key logger for “old style” keyboards, the link is below.
I hope all these tips help. Don’t forget to donate to the developers that made the Firefox add-ons. Remember, your house, your rules.

KeyLlama 4MB USB Premier Keylogger
KeyLlama 4MB PS/2 KeyLogger

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For parents, protecting their children is their number one priority. These days, it’s becoming increasingly more difficult.  The internet is becoming a part of our lives every day.  Internet is even on our cell phones, and it has been. A study, conducted by AVG, stated that 69% of children ages 2-5, could operate a computer rather than tie their shoe laces. Of that demographic, 58% could play a video game, but only 52% could ride a bicycle. Games on the Smartphone seemed more appealing than knowing how to call emergency services; with only 20% knowing how to do so.

With any generation, young people adopt technology faster than older ones do, it’s a fact. So knowing this, it’s a parent’s obligation to protect their children from a major threat, the internet.  Face it, it’s all around us, making it even more accessible to children.  Even the schools our children attend, have computers that are connected to the internet. The schools should be doing their best to secure their computers. What about the computers at your home? Most, if not all, computers are connected to the internet. But not only computers! Microsoft’s Xbox 360, Sony’s Play Station, and Nintendo’s Wii can be connected to the internet to have online parties, and stream movies into the home! But keeping the game system safe for your children is easy, just pull the plug, or setup parental controls. The focus of this post is to handle the tricky internet connection, your computer.
Your computer accesses the internet through a web browser. Software designers put in a feature that is beneficial to people accessing public computers. The feature is named something different in every browser, but the concept remains the same. The concept is called Private Browsing. When private browsing is turned on, the browser will not record anything about the browsing session. Essentially it’s like you never went on the internet.  Below I will explain how to turn this feature off, on Internet Explorer 8.0, Firefox, and Safari.
1.       Internet Explorer:
·         Go to Start, then Run and type in gpedit.msc.



·         Now navigate to:  Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Internet Explorer/InPrivate










·         Now on the right-hand side, go ahead and double-click Turn off InPrivate Browsing and choose Enabled.
2.       Firefox: Firefox is a really soft piece of clay. But, in Firefox we cant disable private browsing, instead we can get a key logger, I will explain after this section. We can make the internet family friendly. So, it will be easy to child-proof the internet. All this requires is downloading and installing plug-ins for Firefox. I’ll give you three of my favorite.
·         ProCon Latte: Blocks out any inappropriate websites and any sites that you set that shouldn’t be accessed.
·         LeechBlock: This utility limits access to time wasting websites (Facebook, YouTube, MySpace) during working times.
·         KidZui K2: Loved by Teachers and Parents for smaller children.
3.       Safari: The technique for disabling private browsing is really just removing the option in the menu. Before continuing we must have Xtools installed, its free.  If you have a newer Mac, it should be already included. If you have trouble with these instructions, take advantage of your Mac ownership, and make a appointment at the Genius Bar.
·         Step 1: Go to applications folder in Finder
·         Step 2: right click (with a mighty mouse or 2 button mouse, or Control+click for one button mice) on safari and choose "Show Package Contents"
·         Step 3: Go to Contents, then Resources, then English.lproj folder (or a respective folder for whatever language you have maybe)
·         Step 4: Double click on MainMenu.nib to open it in interface builder
·         Step 5: look at the window with the safari menu, click on Safari to expand it, then click on the Private Browsing menu item
·         Step 6: hit the delete key and it disappears
·         Step 7: hit command+s to save, close interface builder if you want, and relaunch safari.
Of Course at some age, our kids want some more privacy. But as mentioned above we can use a key logger to both keep a eye on them and let them spread their wings. In the case of Facebook, some kids won’t “friend” their parents. With a key logger, you can collect their password to Facebook, and what they posted and commented on. With some investigating you can even log in as them with your newly collected password and actually see what they see, friend yourself, and set privacy settings! The best key logger I have found is below.  I found a key logger for “old style” keyboards, the link is below.
I hope all these tips help. Don’t forget to donate to the developers that made the Firefox add-ons. Remember, your house, your rules.
KeyLlama 4MB USB Premier Keylogger
KeyLlama 4MB PS/2 KeyLogger


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GIVEAWAY!

[WizardRSS: unable to retrieve full-text content]Today I’m announcing the very first giveaway on my blog! The giveaway is a $20 gift card for CSN stores. This is card is good for over 200 stores! One store, All Modern has a great selection of…

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Today I'm announcing the very first giveaway on my blog! The giveaway is a $20 gift card for CSN stores. This is card is good for over 200 stores! One store, All Modern has a great selection of quality, contemporary products to choose from, such as modern bar stools. To sign-up either email me, or comment below! (state that you would like to be signed up)
Giveaways will be held every 2 to 3 months! Everyone has a chance, maybe its you!


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Flash App for iOS Devices: Skyfire

[WizardRSS: unable to retrieve full-text content]Recently the Apple App Store had approved a app that allowed iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad users the ability to view adobe flash videos.  The app is called Skyfire. It first released only for the iPh…

[WizardRSS: unable to retrieve full-text content]

Recently the Apple App Store had approved a app that allowed iPhone, iPod Touch, and iPad users the ability to view adobe flash videos.  The app is called Skyfire. It first released only for the iPhone and iPod touch.

The functionality comes from a slick looking browser. The Adobe Flash program isnt actually in the browser itself. The flash media is sent to the developers servers, where it is converted to iOS friendly format. In my tests the video took a few minutes to load. Sometimes the browser didnt even recognize there was any flash content on the webpage.

So in conclusion, the app has great potential. There is still improvement to be made with the flash video. But it would be nice to see more flash support for Hulu and Facebook games.

A hand kids past a misplaced believer.


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Exports key to U.S. success

Jan 19 – In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says that the American consumer is no longer the driver of the global economy and that high-tech exports are the key to future growth of the…

Jan 19 - In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says that the American consumer is no longer the driver of the global economy and that high-tech exports are the key to future growth of the U.S. economy.

Immelt: Economic efficiencies drive China ahead

Jan 19 – In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says a large and educated workforce is fueling China’s strength and not simply a deflated yuan.

Jan 19 - In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says a large and educated workforce is fueling China's strength and not simply a deflated yuan.

GE CEO says equal access in China is crucial

Jan 19 – In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says true free trade between the the world’s top two economies of U.S. and China is crucial.

Jan 19 - In an exclusive interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt says true free trade between the the world's top two economies of U.S. and China is crucial.

Immelt says GE can succeed in China independently

Jan 19 – In an interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt touts the conglomerate’s success with joint ventures in China, but says GE has succeeded on its own.

Jan 19 - In an interview with Reuters Global Editor-at-Large Chrystia Freeland, GE CEO Jeffrey Immelt touts the conglomerate's success with joint ventures in China, but says GE has succeeded on its own.